Welcome Visitor
Today is Thursday, July 20, 2017

 

The Art of Story: Interview with author Jason Pomerance

    Print
 

There's a novel out now called "Women Like Us," and it deserves your attention. It is a wonderful tale of a broken family picking up the pieces, trying to find compromise amidst dysfunction. Each character is wonderfully crafted, and the tale itself will move you to laughter as well as tears. The novel first caught my eye on inkshares.com, as its prose is honest, emotional, and flowing. I was caught up in the story immediately, and when I finally received my copy last month, the book did not disappoint.

"Women Like Us" is the debut novel of Jason Pomerance, who is no stranger to storytelling, being an author of screenplays (as well as a filmmaker). He was kind enough to grant me an interview, and I hope you enjoy getting to know this emerging author.

jasonheadshotBW-2.jpg

CREDITED BY: Steven Murashige

Jason Pomerance, author

Tell us a little bit about yourself, Jason.

I'm just your typical writer/reader/food-obsessed sometime chef and surfer (although I'm a much better surfer in my head than I am in reality. In reality I sort of suck at catching waves. But I just keep at it!).

What was the inspiration for Women Like Us?

I'm a huge fan of road trip stories. Maybe because there's such great potential for transformation. There's just something about being on the road that seems to have meaning in terms of growth and change for characters. So the original inspiration was to do a story about a mother and son on the road. In fact it started out as a screenplay, but the more I wrote an outline version the more it was feeling more like a piece of fiction so I just kept going.

How long did the novel take to write/what is your writing process like?

It's hard to say exactly how long because I didn't sit down and write it start to finish all at once. I'd pick it up, but then be pulled onto some other project and I'd go back to it when I'd get the chance. My process is not to outline too much or think too much about it ahead, but just let it flow. In fact I have to say on this book, the characters totally took me by surprise. Edith Vale, for example, is the character who many people say stands out the most, but she started out as just a minor player. Then she sort of took on a life of her own and the plot diverged from where I thought it was going -- so it became not just about mother and son but also about mother and slightly demented mother-in-law! I have to say also Mrs. Vale sort of came to life fully formed -- I'm not sure what I was channeling but it was very clear early one who she was and what she was about.

Are there any autobiographical elements to the novel?

I think there's always a part of us in whatever we write, so I'd say yes, for sure. Susan, for example, is a chef, and although I've never worked in a restaurant kitchen, cooking is big part of my life. There's a little bit of surfing in the book and, like I said, I try to surf as best as I can. Like Edith Vale, I enjoy the occasional Manhattan (well, for her it's pretty much nightly) and like Edith I can be a little persnickety about the way I think things should be done!

Do you have any advice for other authors and artists?

This might sound a little cliched but just follow your gut and follow your voice. There's always going to be plenty of people telling you that you can't do something, or you're doing it wrong but if you believe in what you're writing (or whatever you're working on, if it's some other art form) it doesn't matter. The nay-saying is just noise. Also, never quit. Never give up. Just find a way to forge ahead no matter what because in the end it will pay off. Like with Women Like Us. There were points I never thought this book would see the light of day, but now I can hold the book in my hand, which is such a great thing. I've seen it on the shelf in a couple of local bookstores and I see people writing reviews of it on Amazon. It's all very gratifying but if I'd listened to the doubters it never would have happened.

Do you have any other stories or projects you are currently working on that you'd like us to know about?

Yes. I'm trying to get to the finish line on another novel. CELIA ON THE VERGE might fall more into chick-lit territory (for some that's a good thing, for some not so much!). It's about a woman who thought she had her whole future planned out but everything becomes upended when a package arrives in her mailbox 40 years late! When Celia tries to complete the delivery to its rightful recipient, many complications ensue!!

You are a filmmaker as well. Tell us a little more about your work in film.

I'd hesitate to say filmmaker because I'd reserve that for directors and I've never really felt the pull to direct. But I've been a Writers' Guild-card carrying member of the movie business for a long time. I've sold a couple of pilots on the TV end, and worked and many studio projects. But it's always tough seeing anything through to its final form -- kind of like the book business but maybe even tougher because as a writer you have very little control. I am a co-producer of a project that's been a passion -- it's my screen adaptation of Charles Dickinson's novel THE WIDOWS' ADVENTURES, which until recently was set up with Diane Keaton and Jane Fonda attached to star. I fell in love with this book from page one, and somehow I am determined that the movie will come together at some point. It's another crazy road-trip story, which makes sense because as I said I love them, but in this story, the one who does the driving on a cross-country journey is blind while her beer-swilling sister gives direction (they only drive on backroads in the dead of night and very, very slowly!). The book, by the way, is available on Amazon in both physical and eBook versions -- Anybody who likes road trip stories should check it out, or one of Charles' other novels. He's an extremely talented writer.

You are donating a portion of your profits to the Beagle Freedom Project. Tell us about the charity and what inspired you to work with them.

I'm not sure how I stumbled onto the Beagle Freedom Project, but we already had one beagle when I heard about the work they do -- I had no idea beagles were even used for medical and cosmetics tests, and what The Beagle Freedom Project does is negotiate with the labs to get them released when the labs are done with them. Whether or not you are for or against animal testing, I don't think anybody could condone what most labs do, which is euthanize the dogs (or other animals -- BFP also works to free cats, rabbits, pigs and other animals). Anyway, we signed up to foster and then adopt one of these dogs. Derric was part of a group called the Midwest 10!! He'd been in a lab for the first five years of his life. These poor guys have spent their lives in cages and don't know how to do anything (never really even been outdoors) but he's been a joy to have and I can't imagine life without him! During the pre-order phase of Women Like Us, I did a couple of contests that were connected to a Beagle Freedom Project donation, so I just decided I'd continue it as a thank you, because there are a lot of supporters of the group, and they were very supportive of Women Like Us. Their link, by the way, is http://bfp.org

IMG_3393.jpg Jason at home with his happy beagle, Derric

I want to thank Jason Pomerance for the interview. Also worth noting is that Women Like Us is only $1.99 for an ebook through Amazon right now. The link to the page is below. And if you like the book, please take the time to write a quick review for Women Like Us, as reviews are a free way to help out emerging authors. The more reviews, the greater the visibility for the book. Happy reading!

Related Links:

To view and buy "Women Like Us" on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Women-Like-Us-Jason-Pomerance/dp/1942645104/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1472761204&sr=8-1

The "Women Like Us" page on GoodReads:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30007119-women-like-us

Jason Pomerance's Website:

http://www.jasonpomerance.com

Read more from:
Artist Spotlight
Tags: 
art, michael haase, story
Share: 
Related Articles
     Print
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: