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Interview with Phil Rood, "That Illustrator Guy"

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Phil Rood is someone you should know.

He is an illustrator out of Florida, and his work is marvelous. He is a master of body language, and each individual illustration of his tells a story. In my adventures as a writer, I've stumbled across uncountable talented people, but Phil Rood left an impact on me almost immediately. He was recommended to me by fellow authors [Rick Heinz](
https://www.facebook.com/TheSeventhAge/) and J.F. Dubeau, and so I started following Phil's Facebook page.
I recommend you do the same.

Not only are Phil's illustrations carefully detailed and just downright fun, but the man is a study in dedication. He illustrates every single day and posts his work for all to enjoy. Often he will post videos of his illustration process using Facebook's live feature, putting himself on the spot without hesitation.

He has a website (which I encourage you to access by clicking here) where you can peruse his portfolio, check out his latest creations, and purchase his books as well as individual hand-drawn works. Not only is he talented, but he is also an easy fellow to talk to, responding to any fan comments or questions with great efficiency. I had the pleasure of interviewing him, and I hope you enjoy the result, as well as a few of his works and a video of his process below.

piano.jpg

When did you first discover your love of illustrating?

Probably around 12 years ago when I finally got around to going to college. I've always drawn, but when I went to school and studied graphic design, I started to really see the ability for me to practically apply drawing and illustrating.

Who are some of your greatest influences?

Bill Watterson and Gary Larson influenced me early, both in aesthetic ways and in the way their art carried so much humor. Stylistically, I'm influenced a lot by comic artists Jake Parker and Skottie Young and illustrator Ralph Steadman, who is able to cram so much energy into his drawings that they practically move on their own. That's the kind of thing I keep looking for. From a career overview, I think comedian Marc Maron has been very influential to me as well. He's spoken a lot about how he found success by not trying to please everyone, by staying true to his voice, and letting his audience find him. I think there's a lot to be said about that and I've tried to walk that line.

Do you have a favorite illustration or story that you've completed?

Generally, my favorite illustrations tend to be whatever is most recent. I'm constantly trying to improve and if I'm doing it right, I'm happiest with the newest thing off my desk. There are some that have stuck with me over time as being favorites, like a drawing of three demons I drew for my "Monster Alphabet" series... they are modeled after my three sons. As for stories, I recently finished a really simple 14-page comic called "Sally" and I'm very proud of a lot of the work I did in that.

cat.jpg

Give us an idea of your process from concept to complete.

I basically do a couple rough sketches of an idea to try to get an idea of composition and how it's going to be executed. After I'm happy with that, I pencil the drawing on a sheet of Bristol, then I ink right over top of it. That's it. The entire process is pretty laughably simple, but keeping things simple is pretty key for me. If I'm doing a longer form project, like a comic, it gets a bit more complicated, but that's just because there's more things than drawing going on. Storytelling, pacing, layout, and visual storytelling with clarity all have to be taken into consideration. The entire comic/book gets planned out in sketch form, just like I would do for a single illustration. It's pretty much the same process on a bigger scale. When the actual drawing is done, I scan it in, usually at a healthy 600dpi, and open the scan in Photoshop where I can clean it up and get a nice, clean high-resolution bitmap version of it.

Do you have a routine or do you wait for inspiration to strike?

I tend to be of the school of thought that thinks if you sit around and wait for inspiration to strike, you'll be staring at a blank piece of paper for weeks on end. You have to draw something every day, even if it's a 5-minute sketch. If that's all the time I have, then I put all the effort I can into that 5-minute sketch, but I do it and it's something I stress in the classes I teach.

Do your illustrations inspire your stories, or do your stories inspire your illustrations?

There's no hard and fast rule for me either way, but I'd say the tendency is for a drawing to inspire a story, which in turn spawns more drawings, whether that be a written piece or a comic. The initial drawing may just be a character or vehicle I sketch or scribble, but it's enough to get the ball rolling. Sometimes it takes and I get a full illustrated story. Sometimes it ends up in a pile of nothing... the ever growing pile of nothing...

cowboy.jpg

What tools do you use for illustrating?

I'll start with paper since that's an easier answer: My go-to is basically just industry-standard Strathmore 300 Series smooth Bristol. It's heavy and stands up to the abuse I can sometimes put a sheet of paper through. My pens are sort of shifting constantly because I'm a giant pen nerd. At the moment, I'm using Copic Multiliner and Micron tech pens because I'm loving the simple line I get from them, but I also employ various brush pens, markers, and crow quills. I am constantly experimenting with new pens and seeing what kinds of lines and results I can get from them.

What software do you use?

Digitally I just use an old copy of Photoshop Elements for cleanup and color. I'm not much of a colorist, so when I do use it, it's very simple and Elements meets my needs for it, as does the ProCreate app on my iPad. I have played around with that quite a bit in the last year and colored almost all of my "Ink & Sunshine" illustrations with that. As for straight-up digital line drawing, I don't do much, but when I do, I use Sketchbook Pro. It's an older program. Kari Simms and I are developing a video podcast right now that involves live sketching and that is likely going to be our go-to software for that.

Do you have a favorite character out of all the ones you've created?

Not really... I have some affinity for a lot of them that I've told stories with. Some have just been drawings I've made in passing, then put into a folder with the idea "I've got to tell a story with this guy", but as you probably know, the idea file grows fast and we're forced to pick and choose what we have time for. I like a lot of my characters very much, but it's tough to pick a favorite. If I keep drawing them, there's something I love about them, and it's different in each one.

What kind of story are you working on right now?

I have a couple ideas kicking around in my head, but I'm not really working on a story at the moment. I got into the podcasting world about six months ago and have been working with the crew at Blazing Caribou Studios. I have a few shows coming up with them and have been doing an illustration per episode for their "Varmints!" podcast, which I am finding to be all kinds of fun. It's nice to take a break and do some stand-alone illustrations for right now.

Do you ever get into slumps or have periods of creator's block? If so, how do you get out?

Of course I do, the trick is to not let it stop me from getting to the desk. For me the key is to keep showing up, even if no quality is coming out of it. If you want to get over creator's block, you've got to create, you've got to draw something, you've got to write something. I think for me, a lot of it lies in forgetting that I have creator's block and being open to ideas, even simple ones. If I see a person who looks interesting to me, I remember them, I go home, and I draw an exaggerated version of them in my sketchbook...I make something out of something I see. I take it the next step away from reality. That's creating and it helps get the flow moving again.

Any advice for other illustrators or storytellers?

Write or draw every day. Lack of time is not an excuse. If it's truly important to you, you will find the time.

Related Links:

Phil Rood's website: http://philrood.com/

Phil Rood's Facebook page: Phil Rood, That Illustrator Guy

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artist, Illustrator, Interview, Phil Rood
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